October 16, 2013



Whether you have a few virtual machines, a virtual private server, or an entire virtual infrastructure, virtualization management is essential for maximizing performance and capacity. The better managed your environment is, the fewer investments you’ll need to make in the future. Use these virtualization management techniques to squeeze more from your virtual machines and virtual private server.

1. Recover wasted resources – Do you have an unused, idle, or powered off virtual private server or machines? These machines are typically allotted resources that other machines could be using. If nothing else, they take up disk space. Use your virtualization management console’s features to find and recover wasted resources. Depending on how many unused virtual machines and virtual private server machines you have claiming resources that they don’t need, the savings could be significant.

2. Ask your clusters to do more – Use your virtualization management console to analyze cluster utilization. Can you find any clusters that are under-utilized? If your virtualization management console includes planning and analysis tools, use them to identify underutilized clusters.

3. Eliminate virtual machines and servers that are no longer needed – Imagine a single user that needs several virtual machines for various purposes. Some of those purposes may have been one-off instances. Meanwhile the virtual machine still exists, complete with its fair share of resources allotted to it even though it is no longer required. While a single virtual machine may not be the problem, imagine an entire enterprise filled with occasional one-time needs. It doesn’t take long before you have a significant number of virtual machines that no one needs. Use your virtualization management tools to identify inactive machines that are candidates for elimination. One way to avoid issues with temporary virtual machines is to assign expiration dates to those that are intended to be used on a temporary basis (Source: http://www.tegile.com/solutions/server-virtualization-solutions).

 Recovering wasted resources, asking clusters to do more, and eliminating virtual servers and machines that are no longer needed are three virtualization management steps that can free up resources.

October 2, 2013

Comments Off on kacoPassive Income Online – The Best Concept For A Teenager, A Job Doer Or A Retired Professional?

kacoPassive Income Online – The Best Concept For A Teenager, A Job Doer Or A Retired Professional?

Passive income online – it’s something mankind have fantasizing since the very first day of life on this earth. Everyone needs some supplements, some extra foods, and some extra cash. Today, it has become extremely challenging to lead a life with utmost financial security or luxury unless you’re a millionaire. None is out of the financial unrests or uncertainties. That’s why, the importance of passive income has grown even beyond the imagination.

No matter what you’re doing right now, how much you’re making – you need more money, more income sources to secure your future. The concept of making passive income online has made it possible to make your dream come true. No matter if you’re an ambitious teenager, or you’re an employee at a company or, you’ve just retired from the job – you can start making passive income online in no time!

Passive Income Online: Who’s This Income Idea For? Teen Students, A Professional Or A Retired Employee?

You can see, there is nothing to discuss about the business owners or entrepreneurs. They have already optimized their businesses to run properly without extensive supervision or close observation. So, they have mostly automated their businesses. So who else is left for these passive income opportunities online? Definitely someone who’s got some time to spare on experimental projects from home and needs extra cash!

#1 how that works for a teenager?

A school-going teenager often needs to search for odd jobs or assistant jobs for arranging their pocket money. However, they don’t really need to earn a lot; but at the same time they are full of creativity, energy and enthusiasm. So at a tender age, entrepreneurship is nothing less than an adventure. In most cases, it’s seen that the teenagers shine with passive income prospects better than anyone else. So the early, the better – it’s the most suitable statement for passive income generators online!

#2 does an employee have the chance to become an entrepreneur?

For an employee working 40 hours a week at a company, it can be extremely difficult to concentrate on something else like setting up a passive income source online. But the best thing is – they are already making sufficient amount of money for earning the bread and butter; why not going a mile more to earn some extra cash that can be spent for a luxury tour to an island? A passive income generator can help you surprise your family, get something that’s worth millions or even more! So, it’d be great if you spend some of your leisure on such opportunities online!

#3 a retired professional have plenty of time to spare!

Definitely, it’s a great idea for a retired professional to spend his time on something creative and something productive. He has a lot of time to spend, has years of experience and he knows many things about business operations – it’s a win-win situation for him or her!

The fact is – the concept works fine for almost anyone who’s keen to make money online. However, the early, the better – this is the most favorite statement of most internet marketers for the newbies. But there’s also another saying – better late than never! If you haven’t started something, it’s high time to take an initiative, no matter how old are you or what you do!

Want to learn more on how to make passive income online? Join us at www.passiveincomeformula.netand explore some of the most powerful passive income generators on the internet of all time!

September 26, 2013

Comments Off on The Keys to Help Your Business in a Digital Age

The Keys to Help Your Business in a Digital Age

With the emergence of new technologies, consuming and disseminating information has changed over the last couple of decades. Recently, I was speaking to one retailer who asked “What happened to the time when good products, customer service and a few flyers around town was enough to advertise my store?”

New technology, social media tools and social networking sites like Facebook.com, where users can join and create groups, has certainly changed the landscape. Now with a new generation of customers becoming parents who expect a successful business to have a solid Internet presence; it may seem more difficult to market your business. 

Although the means to communicate with consumers have evolved into more options, I must slightly disagree with my colleague’s statement above. The core competencies of your business should always be to provide customers with high quality products and outstanding customer service. No matter how many cool new web sites pop up or new tools created, customers will become loyal customers if and only if you have good values. Just as it has been in the past, if customers have a good experience they will share it with their network of family, friends and co-workers. But it is in this Digital Age where customers’ networks have now become exponentially larger.

The very existence of blogs and social networking sites promotes finding, sharing and connecting with those of the same interest. Networks are no longer formed by only those you interact with face to face; networks have now been formed and solidified online. For many industries especially retail, this provides an excellent medium to generate business. Excellent customer service is even more important than before as customers will share their experiences with networks online. Word of Mouth is growing and customers are taking notice. According to NOP World, 93 percent of people believe that Word of Mouth is the most reliable way to find out information on products and services. Conversely, customers will share bad experiences and in some cases even more so than positive experiences.

There are so many stories of businesses both big and small who have taken lightly the power of the Internet and how messages can be distributed virally. One example that specifically relates to the baby industry is Motrin. The Motrin online banner ad suggested that Moms who wear baby slings experience back pain all to look like an “official mom.” It also suggested that moms look tired and crazy. Moms were outraged, so outraged that they set up Twitter accounts and frequently tweeted. Mom bloggers also highlighted the ad negatively. Within 48 hours the ad was taken down and an apology was posted from the Vice President of Marketing at McNeil Consumer Healthcare on the Motrin site.

On a smaller scale, a friend of mine recently posted a bad experience she had at Starbucks as opposed to a good experience she had at a smaller coffee shop downtown. My friend is an avid reader of the New York Times. When she visited a local coffee shop in downtown Atlanta, she noticed a copy of the New York Times on the counter and asked if she could purchase it. The employee informed her that they did not sell the New York Times and it was her personal copy. However, after seeing how disappointed my friend was, the coffee shop employee offered my friend her personal copy of the publication.

A couple of days later, my friend visited Starbucks. It was about an hour before closing and she asked if she could purchase the New York Times at a discounted rate (she knew at the end of each day Starbucks trashed the days recent publication). The store manager adamantly refused and wanted her to pay full price. Put off by this experience, she blogged about it on Facebook and tagged her network. In the blog post she gives praise to the small local coffee shop and provides a link to the shop as well as directions via Google maps, while she negatively reviewed Starbucks. While she might have shared this experience with one or two friends a couple of years ago, more than a couple of hundred people now have heard about her negative experience at Starbucks.

Negative reviews and word of mouth won’t necessarily shut your business down, but in this digital age now more than ever it is important to invest in good people who will provide great customer service. It is also important to know what people are saying about you and your competition. This is a way to give your company a competitive edge. A great social media network is Twitter. Twitter is a social networking that allows for you to connect with others online by “following” or to be “followed.” Twitter only allows for 140 characters with each post, therefore messages must be short and concise. Through numerous Twitter applications, business can monitor their online reputation, answer questions related to their business or industry and answer customer care related questions. Another simpler approach to online reputation management is through Google Alerts.

Through a Gmail account, Google alerts provides you with updates on certain terms/keywords you would like to know more about. Several employees at Regal Lager have alerts for our company as well as the brands we distribute. This has been a phenomenal tool in answering questions about our products and gaining customer insights. Google allows you to select how frequently you would like to be updated (daily, as it happens, weekly) and will email you with a link to the specific mention of the keyword. This will help you know what products and brands customers are looking for, shape your marketing message to gain new customers and improve upon consumer experience.

There are many remarkable tools and technology that are very helpful in conveying your message as well as connecting with others. These tools are instruments that should build upon the solid foundation of your business – providing customers with an exceptional experience through products and services.

September 23, 2013

Comments Off on Doing Business in Vietnam: Understanding the Cultural Differences

Doing Business in Vietnam: Understanding the Cultural Differences


In today’s global business environment with your business it is important to have some understanding of the people and the culture that you have intentions of doing business.

The better prepared you are, the more successful your business negotiations are likely to be, “to be forewarned, is to be forearmed”, it’s your choice.

I have included some basic strategies and options that if properly used will enhance and improve your level of success. These suggestions are based on a number of years of personal business experience, in the real world with real people. Taking this approach works and I can assure you, it works well.


1. Family Culture
2. Reputation – “Saving face”
3. Name Structure
4. Greetings
5. Bribery and Corruption
6. Gift Giving
7. Standard Working Practices
8. Business Meetings – preparation
9. Business Meetings – what to expect
10. Business Culture – communication
11. Asking Questions
12. Festivals/Holidays
13. Compliments
14. Social Gatherings
15. Superstitions
16. Other – Traditional Vietnamese customs
17. Summary

Although with today’s technology we can conduct much of our business online, in this type of scenario, it can only take you so far. There is no substitute for actually being there, in person and immersing yourself in the local environment.

I believe we often lose sight of the fact that technology is just a tool that can help us to do our job, the true nature of business, is all about people.

1. Family Culture

The first step in getting a handle on how to do business in Vietnam is to understand what the prevailing dynamics are that defines the parameters of their social structure. By having some familiarity with these basic cultural aspects of Vietnamese society and by using a little empathy, we can start to understand the key elements that are the mainstay of their society and in turn how it defines and influences their business culture.

– Chinese Confucianism plays a very big role in their philosophical beliefs and in their daily life
– Elder’s are generally revered and their life experiences are held in high esteem within the family
– It becomes self evident why you see a number of generations of a family living under one roof
– The male makes the final decision for most, if not all matters, the traditional ideal of male superiority is still in place today
– The eldest son of a family is seen as the head of household, and in this case, the elder is usually seen as a role model
– Worshipping of ancestors is common place, as they are seen as the source of life, fortunes, and a key tenant that upholds their family culture
– Their ancestors are honoured and on the day of their death they often perform special ceremonies and rituals, to the Vietnamese their deceased elders are considered the wellspring of their very existence
– Birthdays are not generally celebrated by traditional Vietnamese families
– Vietnam is basically a collectivist society in which the needs of the group are often placed over that of the individual, this holds particularly true in the family values context
– Family and community concerns will almost always come before business or individual needs
– The family ethos plays a very important, central role in Vietnamese society
– Families, extended families and communities can have a major influence on an individual family members behaviour whether they be children or adults

The essence of “family” is one of the most important characteristics of Vietnamese culture, “family” is everything. And it’s worth keeping in mind that Vietnam is also a patriarchal type of society in regard to the family ethos. A similar sort of hierarchy is in place in most Vietnamese companies to varying degrees.

Vietnamese society is rapidly changing, as the country opens up, as the society becomes more affluent, the Vietnamese are over time becoming more “western-like” in nature. Some of the long held family traditions are starting to slip away.

As the younger generations are exposed to more and more western culture, some of those long-held traditional family values are being eroded and the western mind-set and culture is fast becoming more prevalent.

2. Reputation – “Saving Face”

The concept of saving “face”, occurs all over Asia, in some cases it is the overriding factor in everything they do. Today in some of the more developed Asian countries this mind-set is not as strictly adhered to as it once was.

– The concept of saving face is still extremely important
– Reputation confers dignity and the prestige of a person and by virtue that persons family
– Particularly with the Vietnamese it is ingrained into their very psyche, “reputation” is seen as the only thing that can be left behind for one’s family after death

As the younger, more educated generations, start to make their presence felt in their own cultures, these changes will become more pronounced. Some of these types of traditional beliefs are starting to take a small step back, however do not underestimate how much impact; “reputation” will have on your business negotiations in Vietnam.

3. Name Structure

– Names are written in the following order: 1. Family name. 2. Middle name and 3. Given name (Christian name)
– The family name is placed first because it emphasises the person’s heritage, the family, as mentioned previously, “family” is everything
– The middle name “Thi” indicates that the person is female, “Van” indicates that the person is male

4. Greetings

– For more important occasions, use the family name, middle name and finally the given name
– Using the word “Thua” which means “please” being polite rates you more highly in their eyes
– Addressing a person older or higher ranking than you just by name is considered disrespectful; even within the family or in relative relationships, always include their title with their first name
– Generally women do not shake hands with each other or with men; they bow slightly to each other
– If it comes to age versus rank, higher ranking people are usually greeted first

5. Bribery and Corruption

Be aware that various forms of it exist at all levels within Vietnamese society; it is an integral part of their culture and has been for a long time. One of the main reasons this occurs, is that the “standard” wages in a lot of business sectors in Vietnam is very low, this also includes government departments. At the lower end of the scale, monthly salaries can be as low as $100 (US) per month.

– Recommended resource: Transparency International
Corruptions Perceptions index for 2012, which covers 174 countries, the higher the number, the more corrupt a country is perceived to be:
o Vietnam – 123
o Cambodia – 157
o Laos – 160
o Myanmar – 172
– Recommended resource: Tuoitre News (English language news site for Vietnam)

This is generally acknowledged to be a sensitive area, from an ethics point of view, you will need to make your own decisions. Some sectors of business are different to others, it pays to be informed. All I can suggest is to do a decent amount of research, from that you can draw your own conclusions and make informed decisions.

I suggest that your research be focussed on understanding the “how” and “where” of commissions. Somewhere along the line, you will be paying commissions, whether you know it, or not. You need to know where this is going to happen, how it is going to happen, and most importantly, what it is going to cost, be prepared.

Ensure that when you do business in Vietnam you get as close to the source as possible, if you are sourcing products, only deal with the manufacturers.

The further away you are from the people that can actually do the job, the more it will cost, as everybody involved has to get their commission, which you will be paying.

6. Gift Giving

Gift giving is a common practice in Vietnam and is not seen as any sort of bribery; these thank-you gifts do not need to be expensive and should be seen as a small token of your appreciation.

It can be surprising how genuinely thankful the Vietnamese can be when you present them with small gifts, it puts you in good stead for further negotiations, there are a few options available.

– Flowers
– Chocolates/candy
– Fruit

One of the most effective gifts that you can give them, are small souvenirs that represent your home country. For example if you are from Australia buy a dozen or so, small key-rings, with kangaroo’s, koalas, boomerang’s etc, they only cost a few dollars each.

Go to the lengths of wrapping them up in a box with bright wrapping paper. This sort of approach will earn you loads of “brownie-points”, far more than what it cost you to purchase these types of gifts, it is a terrific investment for the future

7. Standard Working Practices

Standard business hours apply, 8am-5pm, Monday to Friday in the larger cities. Some corporate offices and Government departments are open for a half-day on Saturday. In regional areas, hours may differ and shops may close over the lunchtime period for an hour or more.

– When conducting your business in major cities in Vietnam, English is quite widely spoken by Vietnamese business people. Do not automatically make the assumption that their English is going to be good enough to give you the all information you require

– The further out you go into the regional areas and provinces, the more difficult it is to find these small family run businesses and the less English is spoken. Therefore plan your trip well to cover any eventuality

If in any doubt, hire a translator and save yourself a lot of headaches. Finding the right translator for you is very important and it is not an easy process. I would suggest here, that you get your translator to sign one of your company confidentiality agreements.

One copy in English and one in Vietnamese, get them to sign both copies and make sure you give them a copy of both and keep the originals for your records. You need to be absolutely certain that the translator you have hired is on your side, not theirs (commission).

8. Business Meetings (preparation)

Vietnamese business people prefer to schedule business meetings well in advance, several weeks ahead is not uncommon, this holds especially true when they know you are visiting from another country. They will do a lot of preparing for these types of meetings; you should be doing the same.

– The 1st meeting in many ways, is the most important, you can use your agenda, as a starting point for your key discussion items. Minutes, take notes, document all decisions, actions, timeframes etc
– Prior to the meeting I would recommend that you also supply a written agenda in point form (a list), outlining very specifically your objectives, the how, what, where, when, who etc
– Within 24 hours of the meeting taking place, send your official business minutes to all the individuals that attended the meeting
– Keep in mind you have the option of arranging your initial meeting(s), at the hotel you will be staying. This can save a lot of hassle if you don’t know your way around. You also have the advantage of being on “neutral” territory and you may not have to deal with as many people in your first round of discussions
– Later on, when you’ve narrowed down your selection, you can then arrange meetings at their premises. This is absolutely mandatory, before you make the decision who to do business (How will you know that the business they are showing you is actually theirs?)
– Find out beforehand exactly who will be at the meeting, find out their names and titles and try to send your agenda to them directly from you. Rather than relying on one person in their organisation to distribute your agenda to the right people internally
– If you really want to impress them you could; a) get the agenda translated into Vietnamese, and/or b) bring a translator to the meeting. If you do this, do not tell them beforehand you are bringing one
– Always assume that the other parties’ command of the English language (conversation) will not be as good as their ability to read English

As they say, “the-devil-is-in-the-detail”, by taking the time and effort to go to this level of detail you will achieve a lot more, in a shorter time frame.

1. It will give you some control over the events taking place
2. You will impress them and as a result gain much respect (“face”)
3. You will be able to move your negotiations along a lot faster
4. You have made a framework that both parties understand and can work within

Most importantly, you have provided a “non-confrontational” way to tackle any ensuing issues or delicate problems, its now about the issue, not the person.

9. Business Meetings (what to expect)

Punctuality is extremely important; it pays to be on time to meetings, do not take any chances. Some places can be very difficult to find, plan to be at the location of the meeting 15-20 minutes beforehand. It gives you time to focus and allows you to take in your surrounding environment.

– When first at the meeting watch carefully the seating arrangement, this will give you some indication of the internal pecking order
– Do not be surprised if the most senior person at the meeting does not chair the meeting. If you have taken the approach I suggest, at this point you have a subtle level of control, make the most of it, and handle it very delicately
– The person most likely to conduct the meeting is the person that speaks and understands English the best, but it is highly unlikely that this person will be the actual decision maker
– When at the meeting, never a say a flat “no” to anything, the best response is something like; “yes, I’ll have to go away, and think about that one” or “yes, but I will need to confer with my work colleagues back home” or “I don’t have the authority to make that decision”
– When they ask, “How long are you here for”, do not divulge this information. Answer the question with something like, “When I have concluded all my business, I will then return home”, or “When I have completed my assignment, I can return home”

Always smile, even when you’re saying no, or if you’re confused or not sure. If anything “out of the blue” suddenly appears, something completely unsuspected, take careful note of what it is. Make sure you ascertain the ramifications of this new information, before moving on to the other items in your agenda.

10. Business Culture (communication)

Vietnamese companies tend to be very hierarchical in nature; the most senior person in the business usually carries the most influence in the decision-making process. Titles are very important in the Vietnamese business culture as status is gained by education and age.

There is great deference and respect paid to fellow work colleagues, supervisors and managers, some key points to keep in mind.

– Business relationships in Vietnam are relatively formal and tend to take time to develop as Vietnamese like to get to know their foreign counterparts before conducting business
– Vietnamese may be suspicious of those who they do not know very well at first, so be sure to spend the time during the first few meetings to get better acquainted
– It is important to use titles whenever possible, you are showing respect and you are gaining “face” while doing it
– When referring to one another, Vietnamese people use a person’s title followed by their first name, not their surname (e.g.; Mr John)
– It may be advisable to have all written documents translated into Vietnamese as your business counterparts in Vietnam will not necessarily indicate that they do not fully understand you. If you are not sure what their true English language capability is, hiring a translator may prove a very worthwhile option
– Like most Asian countries business cards are a commonly used in Vietnam; it is considered good business etiquette to have your business cards printed in both English and Vietnamese
– When offering your business card for the first time, present it using both hands with the Vietnamese language side facing up and towards the person you are offering
– Negotiations can be quite lengthy and time-consuming as the Vietnamese will want to examine everything as well as consulting their own group before reaching any agreement
– Doing business in Vietnam can also be quite slow as there is often a lot of bureaucracy to go through before a deal can be finalised. Make sure all official (government) documentation is correctly filled-in, it is stamped and certified by all the relevant government agencies
– Most Vietnamese tend to hide their feelings, avoid conflict and confrontation, in order to avoid hurting or embarrassing anyone. For example, a ‘Yes’ may not actually be an affirmative answer, but it could be a polite reply used to avoid hurting the feelings of the person in question (You really need to be able to tell the difference)
– The Vietnamese usually smile when they do not want to answer an embarrassing question or when they do not want to offend the person involved
– The Vietnamese will smile when being scolded by a person senior in age or status to show them that they still respect the persons scolding and do not hold any grudge. (This pattern of behaviour can be interpreted as challenging or insulting to a westerner, but the reality is, it is part of their nature and it is a cultural norm)

A word about non-verbal communication be careful when interpreting Vietnamese body language, hand gestures, tone-of-voice, and facial expressions. The assumptions and deductions you may make as a westerner based on your prior experience, are in all likelihood somewhat off the mark.

They may use the same sort of gestures, but some of these gestures you are familiar with, may mean something altogether different to the Vietnamese.

Finally, when wrapping-up a meeting, always end on a positive note, a little bit of well placed flattery goes a long, and always remember, smile, smile, smile… ï��

11. Asking Questions

When a Vietnamese person asks you questions, for them it is not considered offensive or rude in their culture to ask personal questions regarding age, marital status, salary, religion, etc.

Make the opportunity to find out whatever you can about the people you are dealing with, have some informal, casual conversations and ask the following types of questions.

– Single or married, do you have children, ages, sex etc?
– What qualifications do you have, degrees, where did you go to Uni etc?
– Have you been overseas, where, what did you do etc?
– How long have you been working for this company?

Keep the discussion light and breezy, this sort of inquiry serves a number of useful purposes; you are establishing some rapport and comfort with the other players, you get some idea of their capability, and you can subtly find out who speaks the best English.

12. Festivals/Holidays

Tet, around this time of year the country practically “shuts-down” and although it’s officially a four day holiday, these holidays can start earlier and they can go on longer. I would suggest that a week prior to “Tet” and a week after, there is little point in attempting to schedule meetings and conduct business.
For Many Vietnamese, this holiday is extremely important; they all try to get together under one roof as a family unit to celebrate the “Chinese” New Year.
– Lunar New Year, is the most important yearly festival
– This is the first day of the lunar calendar year
Tet Trung Thu
– Tet Trung Thu is held on the fifteenth day of the 8th month, the mid-Autumn festival

13. Compliments

The Vietnamese do not say “thank you” very often, because it is considered insincere. When they do, they really mean it, and this form of gratitude can last a lifetime. They will not be happy until they can somehow find a way to repay the kindness you have shown them.

14. Social Gatherings

In the social context, when referring to one another, the term “brother” or “sister” is often used.

This term is a sign of respect; it is the younger members in the group that are subtly acknowledging the people older than them, by referring to them as their “brother” or “sister”.

If a Vietnamese person refers to a westerner as a “brother” or “sister”, in casual conversations at social gatherings, you have by your very actions earned their respect. That in itself is a huge win; you need to congratulate yourself, because you’re doing exceptionally well.

In social situations and informal gatherings, whoever is the oldest present, is the person that is automatically considered the leader.

15. Superstitions

The Vietnamese are very superstitious people; a good example of this is the “owl”, in western society it is usually perceived as a symbol of wisdom or being wise. To the Vietnamese the owl is a bad omen, a harbinger of death.
Whatever happens do not become a “bad” omen to them; if the Vietnamese business people you are dealing with see you as being “lucky”, they will go to great lengths to secure not only your business, but your friendship as well.

16. Other Traditional Vietnamese Customs (useful to know)

Friendships are highly valued, especially between close friends, they are often regarded as blood relatives; overall most Vietnamese are warm, friendly and hospitable.

– When a child is born, it is considered to be one year old
– When women marry, they don’t change their name
– It is the eldest sons filial duty to perform ancestor worship at home
– If a parent dies, the children customarily wait three years before marrying
– If a spouse dies, one should wait one year before remarrying
– If a sibling dies, the other siblings should wait one year before marrying

17. Summary

If you have serious intentions of doing business in Vietnam, there is no substitute for actually being there “in-situ”, viscerally in touch with the local environment. Take a little time to get acclimatised, get the “feel” of the place, the sights, the sounds, the smells.

It pays to explore and move around on foot, stopping here and there and watching the Vietnamese people going about their daily lives. It’s not just what they do, but far more telling, is the actual way that they do it.

Finally, don’t forget the networking, get out on the streets, and find westerners that live or work in Vietnam. Strike up a conversation with them, you will be amazed the wealth of knowledge and experience these sort of people have accumulated. In the right circumstances you may be able to tap into their network, now that’s time and effort well spent over a beer.

Wishing you, dear reader the best of luck with your business negotiations and I hope that this article has provided you with some useful insights that will make your business negotiations in Vietnam easier and more effective.

Many thanks for reading this article.

September 17, 2013




Video for business isn’t new. In fact, businesses have been using video for decades now. However, video technology has changed dramatically in recent years. For example, most laptops come equipped with webcams and microphones. Many workers have high resolution video cameras built directly into their smartphones and tablets. In addition to being able to quickly and easily create videos, today’s workforce has access to a wealth of information in video form thanks to video for business channels of YouTube, private networks, and more. Below are a few ways businesses and employees.

  • Impromptu meetings – Webcasting software allows employees to hold face-to-face video meetings as needed. Whether two sales managers need to strategize one-on-one or the CEO wants to deliver an important message to the entire organization, webcasting can make it happen.
  • Training sessions – Video for business is ideal for corporate training, and several options exist. For example, you could hold and record a traditional training session and then post the final video on a private YouTube channel. You could also host a webinar training session and record it for future use. With webcasting, trainees can participate in live training from the convenience of their desktops (Source: MediaPlatform webinar services).
  • Team building – Companies often use video for business to build team spirit. For example, employees may be encouraged to submit internal team videos in support of an upcoming product release or charity campaign. This is a fun way to use video for business, build camaraderie, and encourage teamwork.
  • Share PowerPoint presentations – Employees put a great deal of effort into creating powerful PowerPoint presentations. These presentations are often shown at staff meetings never to be seen again. With video for business webcasting tools, you can share your presentations across the company if desired. Presentations with a long shelf-life can be enjoyed for years to come by current and future employees.

Video for business has changed thanks to the Internet and new technologies such as webcasting. How will you use video for business?